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History

Our Curriculum Aims:

History is inescapable. It studies the past and the legacies of the past in the present. Far from being 'dead', it connects things through time and encourages its students to take a long view of such connections.  All people and peoples are living histories, so understanding the linkages between past and present is fundamental for a good understanding of the condition of being human. That, in a nutshell, is why History matters. It is not just 'useful', it is essential for rooting people in time.

(Penelope Corfield, Historian & Educational Consultant)

If History is fundamental for the condition of being human, as Corfield states, then it is imperative that we at AGSB provide a History curriculum which is inclusive and reflects the diversity of Modern Britain and our school community.  At the same time, History is at its most engaging, and students think most critically when there is a sense of story within which they can make complex connections.  With that in mind, we aim within our programme of study:

  • To provide a global curriculum which helps students understand Britain’s changing place in the world
  • To provide an inclusive curriculum which integrates diverse histories into the story of Britain’s and the world’s past
  • To provide a coherent overarching narrative across each key stage

We hope that, by achieving these aims, we will enhance students’ cultural capital and, therefore, their ability to make a full contribution to society as active citizens.  History is, after all, also ‘useful’, as Corfield acknowledges.  Whilst this should not detract from its inherent value, History undoubtedly has a crucial role to play in this respect.  We therefore also aim:

  • To guide students in developing the key transferable skills that enable them to successfully navigate, and thrive in, our complex twenty-first society:  Foremost amongst these are: 
  • An ability to critically evaluate the credibility of any source and/or interpretation of the past
  • An ability to reach clear, supported and coherent independent judgements 
  • An appreciation of the value of cooperation and common endeavor 
  • An ability to communicate clearly and confidently both verbally and in writing
  • A curiosity to want to learn more, ask questions and challenge existing orthodoxies
  • An ability to distance themselves from their own prejudices, appreciate different perspectives and see historical controversies in their own context

As Napoleon put it, ‘History is merely the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon.’  Orthodoxies are there to be appropriately but critically and creatively questioned and challenged.  We promote that mindset through our debating and public speaking competitions, through our domestic and overseas curriculum enrichment visits and most importantly through our core business in the classroom.  If our students really appreciate Napoleon’s remark, and its implications, by the time they leave us, we will have gone some way to achieving our aims. 

KS3 Course Followed: History
Year 7 –
Britain and its place in the Medieval World, c1066-c1450: Migration, War & Identity 

 

Name of topic

Key Content of the Topic

Assessment points

HT 1

Pre-1066 Study -  Impact of Migration to Britain before 1066

Intro to History & Migration topic
Celts
Romans
Anglo-Saxons
Vikings

Key Fact Test on Legacy of Migrant Groups

HT 2

 Norman Conquest

3 claimants
Stamford Bridge
Hastings
Why William Won
Establishment of Control

Battle of Hastings Essay

 

HT 3

Medieval Castles

Motte & Bailey
Watch Hill Castle, Bowdon
Development of castles
Concentric Castles
Attacking & Defending castles
Life in a Castle

Medieval Castle Display Board

HT 4

Medieval Religion

Role & Importance of Religion & The Priest
Doom paintings
Monks & Nuns
Henry & Becket

N/A

HT 5

Islamic Golden Age & Crusades

Harun Al-Rashid & Start of Golden Age
Contributions & Key aspects
The Mongols, Siege of Baghdad & End of Golden Age
Intro to Crusades
Motivations of Crusaders
History of Conflict 
Impact of Crusades   

End of Year Exam

HT 6

Emergence of Early Modern Britain

John & Magna Carta
De Montfort & Parliament
Altrincham Charter
Edward I’s Wars (2)
Black Death (2)
Peasant’s Revolt
Hundred Years’ War

Hundred Years War Movie Trailer

Year 8 - Britain and its place in the world c.1450-c.1850: Renaissance, Reformation & Revolution

 

Name of topic

Key Content of the Topic

Assessment points

HT 1

European Renaissance & Voyages of Discovery

Introduction: The World in 1450 & Overview of 1400-1850
Intro to & Causes of Renaissance
Impact of Renaissance
Da Vinci
Voyages: Who & Where
Reasons for Voyages
Impact of Voyages

Columbus: A Contested Legacy (Interpretation Question)

HT 2

European Reformation & Tudor Britain

Henry VII
Henry VIII
Continental Reformation: Criticisms of Catholic Church
Catholics & Protestants
Henry VIII’s Great Matter
Break with Rome
Dissolution
Edward’s Radical Reformation
Mary’s Counter-Reformation

Break with Rome (Source Assessment)

 

HT 3

Elizabeth & The End of the Spanish Golden Age

Spanish Golden Age
Elizabeth’s Problems
Causes of Armada
Why England Won
Fall of Spain & the Dutch Golden Age

Armada Essay

 

HT 4

Enlightenment & Revolution

Witchcraft
Enlightenment
Scientific Revolution
Key Scientists
Political Revolution: England
Political Revolution: France &/or America   

End of Year Exam

HT 5

British Empire & Trade in Enslaved Africans

Britain & its pursuit of Empire
Intro to Trade
Aspects of Trade in Enslaved Africans
Resistance

N/A

HT 6

British Empire & Trade in Enslaved Africans

Abolitionists 
Legacy of White Supremacy in British imperialism
Legacy: Statues of Slave Traders 

Key Fact Test on Trade in Enslaved Africans

Year 9 - Britain and its place in the Modern World, c.1850-c.2000: Fall of Empires & A New World Order

 

Name of topic

Key Content of the Topic

Assessment points

HT 1

Local History: Industrial Manchester

What was Industrial Revolution? Why Britain first?
Canal Mania: Bridgewater Canal
LMR
Cottonopolis
Peterloo Massacre
Cholera epidemic

Industrial Manchester Source Analysis

HT 2

Early Twentieth Century

Intro: The World in 1900; Overview of C20: Democracy, Fascism & Communism
CHINA 1: Boxer Rebellion: Link to Opium Wars
CHINA 2: 1911 Xinhai Revolution
Women’s Suffrage
Long-Term Causes of WW1
Franz Ferdinand
Schlieffen Plan
Recruitment Propaganda
Trench Warfare
Haig & the Somme
Chapel Street: The Bravest Street in England
Empire Troops & the Black ‘Forgotten Regiment’

Haig Interpretation Question

HT 3

Rise of the Dictators & Outbreak of WW2

Impact of WW1: Versailles, Fall of Empires, Rise of Democracy, Spanish Flu & Race Riots in Liverpool
Rise of Mussolini, Stalin & Hitler (also mention Mosley/BUF in Britain)
Causes of WW2 (2) 
CHINA 3: Long March

Causes of WW2 Mini-Essay

HT 4

WW2 & New World Order

Why did Allies Win WW2 overview? (2)
Holocaust (2)
Atomic Bombs
Impact of WW2: Decline of Empires
New World Order: Cold War: Capitalism & Communism                                 

Churchill: A Contested Legacy (Interpretation Question)

HT 5

A Divided World

Truman, Containment & Marshall Plan
Berlin: Epicentre of a divided Europe
Nuclear Arms Race
CHINA 4: 1949
Cuban Missile Crisis
CHINA 5: Great Leap Forward 1958-62
CHINA 6: Cultural Revolution 1966-76

End of Year Exam

HT 6

The Late Twentieth Century

Britain: Sick Man of Europe? (loss of empire; economic decline, EEC,
racial tensions
Reagan & Thatcher’s ‘Second Cold War’
CHINA 7: Den Xiaoping & Economic Reform
Fall of Berlin Wall
CHINA 8: Tiananmen 1989
Collapse of USSR & ‘End of History’?
Britain at the end of the C20  

N/A

What can parents do to support their sons?

Please encourage your son to read around the subject as much as possible. We have an excellent Key Stage Three History library in C5 (usually Ms Cathcart’s room) which all students in Year 7, Year 8 and Year 9 are welcome to use.  Please see Ms Cathcart for further details.  Beyond that, useful historical websites include:

Specialist websites can also be useful for more detailed research, for example:

You can also encourage your son to read historical fiction and non-fiction. He could try to keep an eye on current affairs which often have historical links. There are many well-produced and engaging historical television programmes, from entertaining ‘Horrible Histories’ to informative documentaries. If possible visit local historical sites like the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry, The Imperial War Museum and Dunham Massey.  When you go further afield, Hadrian’s Wall, Edward I’s Welsh castles and the Houses of Parliament are popular attractions. In Europe there are the First and Second World War battlefield sites.  The most important contribution parents can make to support their son’s history studies education is to assist them in developing an active interest in the world around them.


GCSE Course Followed: History
Specification: AQA (
Syllabus code – 8145)
Why Choose GCSE History?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why should you study History?

History is an opportunity to explore the complex motivations of people throughout the ages. The continuing popularity of the subject can be seen in the fact that History departments at universities are some of the most popular and produce some of the most successful graduates. This is because the transferable skills developed through the study of History in research, analytical thinking and verbal and written communication are so highly valued. History graduates can be found in a wide variety of professions including accountancy, management, education, journalism, the civil service, the business world and the law. History also helps students to develop a sense of identity. It teaches them essential life skills, such as the importance of adopting a questioning attitude towards sources, actively engaging with different perspectives and providing evidence to justify conclusions. It also helps them to understand more fully the complex and rapidly changing world in which they live.

Historical Skills Set

Successful GCSE students need to demonstrate a range of skills:

  1. They should be able to handle historical sources; understand and extract information from them; compare them; analyse and evaluate them.
  2. They should have good factual recall and be able to deploy specific knowledge to write and argue clearly.
  3. They should be able to distinguish between the causes and consequences of historical events, to understand change and continuity over time and to recognise similarities and differences between historical events, movements and characters.
  4. They should build their confidence to discuss and debate ideas verbally through active participation in lessons.
  5. They should increasingly seek to take responsibility for their own learning and be willing to research independently beyond what is covered in lessons.

Students in Year 9 have already begun to study the first GCSE History topic on ‘Germany, 1890-1945’ and should therefore, be developing a good understanding of what is involved and a reasonable sense of their own abilities. If they wish to continue with the subject at GCSE level, they should be interested and committed to it. The course as a whole is highly varied, including an engaging combination of British and International History, as well as Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History. It is both challenging and rewarding, whilst also providing an excellent foundation for those students who wish to study History at A Level and beyond.  

Course Content
Unit 1: Section A
Germany, 1890 – 1945: Democracy and Dictatorship

  • Germany and the growth of democracy
  • Germany and the Depression
  • The experiences of Germans under the Nazis

Unit 1: Section B
Conflict and tension in Asia, 1950 - 1975

  • Conflict in Korea
  • Escalation of conflict in Vietnam
  • The ending of conflict in Vietnam

Unit 2: Section A
Migration, empires and the people: c790 to the present day

  • Conquered and conquerors
  • Looking west
  • Expansion and empire
  • Britain in the 20th century

Unit 2: Section B 
Medieval England – the reign of Edward I, 1272 - 1307

  • Government, the rights of King and people
  • Life in Medieval England
  • Edward I’s military campaigns in Wales and Scotland
  • The historic environment of Medieval England

Assessment
All units are assessed by examination at the end of Year 11.  There are two examinations of 120 minutes which are each worth 50%.  There is no coursework or controlled assessment.   

We provide a wide range of information, advice and guidance to students online via the school website.  Please go to the AGSB Homepage, then select ‘Students’, ‘GCSE Study Skills Pack’ and then ‘GCSE History’ to find out more.  The same resources are also available via the STU HISTORY GCSE Group on 365.   

Alternatively, please do not hesitate to contact Mr Croxton, Head of History and Politics, at ncroxton@agsb.co.uk if you have any further questions. 

Key Stage Four Curriculum Overview
Year 10

 

Name of topic

Key Content of the Topic

Assessment points

HT 1

Asia: Korean War

Causes of the Korean War
Development of the Korean War
End of the Korean War

 

HT 2

Asia: Escalation of the Vietnam War

End of French colonial rule
US involvement
Johnson’s War

 

HT 3

Asia: The End of the Vietnam War

Nixon’s War
Opposition to war
End of the war

 

HT 4

Edward I: Government, the rights of king & people

Henry III’s legacy
Development of government, rights and justice

 

HT 5

Edward I: Life in Medieval England

Trade, towns and villages 
Education and Learning
The Development of the Legal System

Trial Exam

HT 6

Edward I: Military Campaigns

Medieval warfare, tactics and technology
Invasion and colonisation of Wales
Relations with Scotland

 

Assessment Points are at the teacher’s discretion at GCSE level.  Assessments take the form of GCSE-style questions or key-fact knowledge tests.    

 

Name of topic

Key Content of the Topic

Assessment points

HT 1

Migration: Conquered and Conquerors

Invasion
A Norman Kingdom and ‘Angevin’ Empire
Birth of an English Identity

 

HT 2

Migration: Looking West  

Sugar and the Caribbean
Colonisation in North America
Migrants to and from Britain

 

HT 3

Migration: Expansion & Empire and Britain in the 20th century

Expansion in India
Expansion in Africa
Migrants to, from and within Britain
End of Empire
Legacy of Empire
Britain’s relationship with Europe and its impact

 

HT 4

Revision: Germany 1890-1945

Review of Germany content covered in Year 9 History

 

HT 5

Revision: Germany 1890-1945

Review of exam technique for questions on Germany

 

HT 6

N/A

N/A

GCSE Exams

Assessment Points are at the teacher’s discretion at GCSE level.  Assessments take the form of GCSE-style questions or key-fact knowledge tests.   

Recommended Revision Guides for GCSE
Students are issued with excellent resources for each of the four GSCE History topics.  These take the form of textbooks for ‘Conflict and Tension in Asia’, ‘The Reign of Edward I’ and ‘Migration, Empire and the People’ and a revision guide for ‘Germany: 1890-1945’.  The Asia textbook is swapped for a Revision Guide in Y11. 
We make a wide range of bespoke revision materials for all four topics available to students within ‘GCSE History’ in the ‘GCSE Study Skills’ folder, accessible via the STU History GCSE Group and the ‘Students’ section of the AGSB website.  

Support available for GCSE Students
Students should always feel able to approach their class teacher in the first instance if they need further support.