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Art

Our Curriculum Aims:  

The aim of the Art and Design department is to give pupils an awareness and understanding of visual language and the skills to develop their own.

Our aim to is provide students a curriculum that encourages students to be confident and independent learners. Our curriculum will provide students opportunities to develop drawing, painting, sculpture, collage, textiles, print and digital media skills. The schemes of work are varied demonstrating a wide range of Art disciplines. Students will be introduced to a range of artists from historical masters to contemporary artists. Students will explore Art history each term to broaden their understanding of how Art has influenced our society. We believe it is important that students develop their critical understanding and can reflect and evaluate their own and the work of others. All pupils study Art and Design in year 7 – 9. We aim to foster the enjoyment of the subject for those not intending to study it beyond key stage 3 as well as providing a solid foundation for those who do.


The Department Subject Achievement Map identifies the skills and knowledge acquisition needed to progress in the subject from year 7-11. 

For each topic studied in Years 7 and 8, Topic Descriptor Sheets detail the knowledge and skills needed to progress in that topic.  Topic Descriptor Sheets are shared with students at the start of every topic. 


Key Stage Three Curriculum Overview

All projects will be taught within a given Year group. However, the order to which they are delivered may vary.

Year 7

Project

Name of topic

Key Content of the Topic

Assessment points

1

Foundation Skills

Students arrive with us with varied experiences from Primary school. The first half-term is designed to ensure all students have a solid consistent foundation of skills and they have a good understanding of key art terms (e.g. tone, texture, marks, line, form, pattern, colour, perspective). Examples of historic and contemporary art are used to support the teaching of the formal elements, aiding the development of their understanding of visual language.

FEDS

Title page

Perspective Drawing

Tonal pencil and colour pencil understanding

Colour Wheel

2

Sweets

Inspired by the work of the photorealistic painter Sarah Graham. Students work towards producing a painting of a selection of sweets. She wants the viewer to enjoy looking at her work, and what is more enjoyable than looking the vibrant colours and patterns of delicious sweets?  During this project students will be taught how to mix, apply paint accurately as well as to carefully observe whilst drawing and photographing from real sweets. Students spend time looking at the work of Sarah Graham and understanding why it is important that we reflect on the work of existing artists.

Artist Research page

Photography of sweets

Drawing of sweets

Painting of sweets

3

Our changing seas

12 lessons

Our changing seas – Is a project that investigates the environmental changes of the coral reef. Students will be introduced to the work of Courtney Mattison who creates ceramics that highlight the everchanging sea. This project will enable students to explore Pattern, texture, form and design in 2D and 3D. Including print techniques and ceramics.

Close up drawings of shells and coral.

Basic ceramic techniques and texture samples

Print outcome

Design page

Ceramic outcome

Exam

Drawing from observation

Shoe Observational Drawing (Drawing is an important skill within art. But we recognise the limitations examining only observational drawing has. Therefore, when arriving at a final grade for the year the students teacher will also reflect on the work produced through out the year)

FEDS

 

Year 8

Project

Name of topic

Key Content of the Topic

Assessment points - FEDS

 1

 

Concept Art and perspective

20 lessons

From Walt Disney to Piet Mondrian, gaming has long been taking visual cues from a great number of artists past and present. In this project, students choose one artist to investigate independently. During lesson time, students learn the technical skills required to draw in two-point perspective. This equips them with the skills to design and draw their own ‘scene’ from a video game that they have created, inspired by their artist of choice. With the ever-growing digital world, designers within it, concept artists are more frequently becoming a clear career path for some of our A-level art students.

 

Basic shapes with tonal shading.

Guided Perspective drawing.

Digital Artist research page.

Design page

Final Perspective Game

 

2

Still life, Vanitas

18 lessons

Still Life is one of the principal forms of Western Art. Within this project students look more specifically at the work of Vanitas Paintings and begin to unpick the messages behind the images. As well as looking at contemporary artists Michael Craig Martin. Students will look to develop their own compositions, reflecting modern day representations of the values displayed in the vanitas paintings of the past. This project focuses its skills within collage, photography lighting, composition, colour theory, line and form.

MCM artist research page.

Photography vanitas still life with annotation.

Vanitas collage

 

3

Textile Food

12 lessons

This concise project is intended to allow all students to have an experience craft and a basic understanding of hand sewing and construction of a 3D textile object. The designing of the doughnut is brief but allows students to express themselves creatively as the inspiration behind the design is only limited by the students’ imagination. Students will look at the work of Lucy Sparrow.

Donut Design and research page.

Stitch practice samples.

Felt 3D Donut.

Exam

Drawing from observation

2 lessons

Observational drawing of a vegetable in colour pencil, e.g pepper. This exam will explore the tonal values of colour pencil.

(Drawing is an important skill within art. But we recognise the limitations examining only observational drawing has. Therefore, when arriving at a final grade for the year the students’ teacher will also reflect on the work produced throughout the year)

 

 

Year 9

Project

Name of topic

Key Content of the Topic

Assessment points

1

Cubist Portraiture

15 lessons

Cubism was one of the most influential styles of the twentieth century. Cubism inspired related movements in music, literature, and architecture. Students will explore cubism and portraiture during this topic, they will develop their observational drawings of the face and understand the proportions of the face. Then experiment with compositions to create a cubist inspired piece. Students will research different artists such as Picasso, Alim Smith, Yi Chen Belin and Quentin Blake.

1-9

Observational drawing

Digital exploration (photography and photoshop)

Collage

Watercolour and pen.

 

2

Urban Structure

15 lessons

Students will produce their own 3D urban structure. It will be based on the interior or exterior of a building. Students will explore a range materials and techniques through guided workshops. Enabling students to produce their own 3D structure made from card and cardboard, other household materials and paint. Techniques will be inspired by Michael C McMillen. These urban structures will then form the backdrop for a piece of their own street art – informed by the work of street artists such as Bansky. Students will be encouraged to produce street art the reflects a current social issue they are passionate about.   

1-9

Painted Texture samples

Drawn study of a building

3D structure

2D Street art outcome with annotation.

 

Exam

Drawing from observation

2 lessons

Observational drawing of either half a face or part of a building. (Drawing is an important skill within art. But we recognise the limitations examining only observational drawing has. Therefore, when arriving at a final grade for the year the student's teacher will also reflect on the work produced throughout the year)

 

1-9

 

What can parents do to support their sons?

Our Art teachers may vary the projects slightly from class to class whilst giving your son a variety of experiences to help him develop his art.

Teachers ask that parents help students to develop the ability to concentrate for an extended period of time on a drawing etc. and to encourage him to be creative and have the tenacity to modify and refine his work in order to improve it. If possible, it would be helpful if you could visit a wide range of stimulating places such as art galleries and museums. You Tube and other online providers also have on-line tutorials. This can be an excellent for students to develop technically proficiency at their own pace. We encourage students to show us work produced in their own time so we can offer support and encouragement in their chosen area of art.

(Please note: Students occasionally need an apron or overall of some sort to wear during their Art lessons, usually a technology apron is fine to use.)


GCSE Course Followed: Art

Specification: AQA (syllabus code 8201-6)

Why Choose GCSE Art craft and design

The course in Year 10 is dynamic and exciting, and although it follows a natural development of that in Year 9, the range of work, materials and processes broaden, and become more experimental as the year progresses.  The main areas of study will include:

  1. Drawing and painting (oil pastel, chalk pastel, pen, ink, oil paint, acrylic paint and a range of mixed media)
  2. Graphic design using Adobe Photoshop on Mac/PC.
  3. Three-dimensional work (wire, clay, card, mesh, papier mâché etc)
  4. Critical Studies – regularly referencing the work of artists/movements to support the work in practical areas 1, 2 and 3.

As with all option subjects, homework is an integral part of the course, though this can take a variety of forms and is often set by the pupil himself in consultation with the teacher.

Assessment

An important feature of the GCSE Art and Design course is the assessment. The final grade at the end of the course is made up of 60% from the coursework and 40% externally set assignment. Students produce project-based work. These projects that make up the coursework and externally set assignment are marked using the same four assessment objectives. The four assessment objectives have equal weighting and run through the heart of this course. This means all projects are based on the principle of learning and responding from the work of artists and other critical sources, recording insights and observation (most commonly, but not exclusively, though the use of drawing and photography), developing experimenting and refining ideas and techniques in order to produce personal responses and outcomes. Throughout the two years it is encouraged that students take risks and push past what comes easily. They are expected to respond to feedback and refine work at every stage up until the moment for final submission. Due to the ongoing nature of the course students benefit from being organised and working consistently throughout the two years. We structure the course and setting of tasks to support students in developing these skills.

Coursework

It is important that students understand the nature of the ‘Coursework’ requirements, as the term is used here in a slightly different sense than may be the case in some other subject areas.

‘Coursework’ here simply refers to all work produced during lesson and homework time over Year 10 and up until January of Year 11 can be used as submission for the 60% coursework. However, it is normal that the class teacher along with the student will decide on a selection of this work ensuring it reflects the highest standards that student has displayed across the four assessment objectives. Throughout it is encouraged that students respond to feedback and refine work at every stage up until the moment for final submission.

However, for the 2021 Cohort, component 2 was removed and so students where only be assessed on component 1, making up 100% of their final mark.

The Externally Set Task

This is a project produced by students during classwork and homework between February and the end of April which concludes with a 10hr controlled exam setting for students to produce an outcome of their choosing. The starting point for this project is set by the exam board. The exam paper contains a range of starting points that allows students an opportunity to find a starting point that interests them and an opportunity to explore artists and techniques of their choice. All the work produced from February including the work produced in the 10 hours is submitted to make up the final 40% of the student's final grade.